We’re delighted to announce another collaboration with Michelin-starred chef Adam Stokes.

The Oyster Club will be a 30-cover restaurant and 24-seater bar serving a variety of high-quality sea food dishes including premium quality fish and chips and of course, fresh oysters – all sourced from the UK. A carefully curated selection of wines and spirits will also be available.

Faber’s Creative Director Tony Matters is excited to be involved with another project from Stokes, having created the design for both the original Adam’s pop-up concept on Bennetts Hill and its current permanent home on Waterloo Street. “Faber has been working with Adam since the very beginning of his journey here in Birmingham; it’s been a privilege to witness his success and play our own small part in that,” he says. “We’re very excited to work with him again in developing this brand-new concept. It’s another vote of confidence for Birmingham’s increasingly world-class dining out scene.”

Scheduled to open on Temple Street Birmingham in February, The Oyster Club takes its name from a group of intellectuals and scientists in Edinburgh in the 1770s who used to meet to debate and exchange ideas over oysters. “It seemed the perfect name for this place,” says Adam. “I want to encourage a neighbourhood feel – we will offer a friendly relaxed service and have regular diners who do see The Oyster Club as a club; where they can meet up and catch up with each other.”

Lead designer on the project, Holly Trehearn, says the design will feel stylish yet laid back, with an interactive feel. “To give the venue presence from the street, we’ve designed a huge, curved oyster bar as the main feature of the ground floor,” she explains. “The idea is for the bar to be more informal than the restaurant, so people will feel comfortable to walk in after work without a booking. The oysters will be shucked up in the bar in front of diners and there is a window into the kitchen so people can watch the chef at work. The design alludes to the textures and materials of the ocean, but in a subtle, understated way, with reeded glass and pearl-like textures.”